Determining SSD Liability

Whether SSD is payable and the rate will depend on:
A. The type of property sold or disposed
B. The date of purchase or acquisition 
C. The date of sale or disposal
D. Rates applicable

A. The Type of Property Sold or Disposed

The type of property is a residential property.

B. The Date of Purchase or Acquisition

  1. If a residential property is purchased on or after 20 Feb 2010, SSD is payable if the residential property is sold within the holding period.
  2. If a residential property owner sells/ disposes of the property which he/ she previously acquired via the following manner:

    Manner of Acquisition  Date of Acquisition
    Transfer pursuant to divorce

    1. Marriage Date; or

    2. Date of original purchase of property;

    whichever is later.

    Transfer pursuant to inheritanceDate of original purchase by the deceased
    Transfer of HDB Flat within FamilyEarliest date of acquisition of the flat by any of the existing owners, and who continually holds an interest in the flat from the time of acquisition to disposal
  3. For non-residential property that is re-zoned to residential or the permitted use is changed to residential, the date of acquisition of the property will be the date of rezoning or the change of use.

C. The Date of Sale or Disposal

Date of Sale/ Disposal refers to:

  1. Date of execution of Option to Purchase by the buyer to the seller’s offer to sell
  2. Date of Sale & Purchase Agreement signed by the seller and buyer
  3. Date of transfer where (1) and (2) are not applicable

D. Rates Applicable

The rates of SSD payable on residential property purchased on and after 20 Feb 2010 and sold within certain duration, are summarized in the table below:

Date of Purchase or Date of Change of Zoning /  Use Holding PeriodSSD Rate (on the actual price or market value, whichever is higher)
Between 20 Feb 2010 and 29 Aug 2010 (all  inclusive)    Up to 1 year 1% on first $180,000
 2% on next $180,000
 3% on remainder
More than 1  year  No SSD payable 
Between 30 Aug 2010 and 13 Jan 2011 (all  inclusive)            Up to 1 year  1% on first $180,000
 2% on next $180,000
 3% on remainder
More than 1  year and up to 2  years 0.67% on first $180,000
 1.33% on next $180,000
 2% on remainder
More than 2 years and up to 3 years     0.33% on first $180,000
 0.67% on next $180,000
 1% on remainder
More than 3 yearsNo SSD payable 
Between 14 Jan 2011 and 10 Mar 2017 (all inclusive)           Up to 1 year 16%
More than 1 year and up to 2 years 12%
More than 2  years and up to 3  years     8% 
More than 3  years and up to 4  years     4%
More than 4  years  No SSD payable
 On and after 11 Mar 2017      Up to 1 year 12%
More than 1 year and up to 2 years 8%
More than 2 years and up to 3 years4%
 More than 3 years No SSD payable

Notes

  1. Where land is sold with existing building, the liability for SSD will be based on the zoning of the land in the Master Plan.
  2. SSD payable to be rounded down to the nearest dollar.
  3. For shophouses with a portion permitted for residential use or HDB shop with living quarters, SSD is payable on the value of the residential component if the property is sold within the holding period.

 

Rates and Computation

SSD is computed by applying the requisite SSD rate on the higher of the selling price or the market value of the property as at the date of sale or disposal.

Where parts of the property was acquired by the vendor at different times, the holding period for each part acquired will be computed from the respective acquisition date.  

Where the sale or disposal comprises only a partial interest in the residential property, SSD payable will be based on the higher of the selling price or market value of the partial interest.

Example 1: For properties purchased between 14 Jan 2011 and 10 Mar 2017 (all inclusive), the holding period is 4 years.
  • Mr M purchased his residential property on 22 Feb 2011 and sold it on 25 Jan 2012 for $1,500,000.
  • Holding period : Less than 1 year
16% of selling price or market value, whichever is higher  $1,500,000 x 16%
 SSD payable  = $240,000

In this example, if the sale of the property is on or after 22 Feb 2015, no SSD is payable. 

  • Mr Q purchased his residential property on 17 Mar 2017 and sold it on 01 Feb 2018 for $1,500,000
  • Holding period : Less than 1 year 
12% of selling price or market value, whichever is higher  $1,500,000 x 12%
 SSD payable  = $180,000

In this example, if the sale of the property is on or after17 Mar 2020, no SSD is payable.                        

     

      Exemptions from SSD for Residential Properties under the Stamp Duties Act

      SSD for residential properties is exempt for sellers / transferors under the following scenarios. No application to Commissioner of Stamp Duties is required for the sellers / transferors.

      1. Licensed housing developers who are governed under the Housing Developers (Control and Licensing) Act need not pay SSD when selling residential properties developed by them.
      2. Public authorities (e.g. HDB and JTC) in exercising their functions and duties need not pay SSD when selling residential properties.
      3. Residential property owners need not pay SSD when their properties are acquired by the Government under the Land Acquisitions Act.
      4. Individuals who own residential properties need not pay SSD if they have been adjudged a bankrupt and are required to dispose of their residential properties as a result of bankruptcy.
      5. Companies that own residential properties need not pay SSD when disposing of their residential properties upon involuntary winding up.
      6. Foreigners need not pay SSD when they have to sell their residential properties as required under the Residential Properties Act.
      7. For HDB flat sellers or transferors who bought or acquired their flats on or after 30 Aug 2010 and their flats have been identified for Selective Enbloc Redevelopment Scheme (SERS) but sell their flats in the open market before HDB claims them.
      8. HDB flat sellers or transferors who return their flats to HDB as a result of re-possession by HDB or under the SERS.
      9. A person who owns an HDB flat, inherits an HDB flat, is required under the HDB’s regulations to dispose of either the inherited HDB flat or the existing HDB flat. This exemption applies to disposal of flats on or after 18 Dec 2015.
      10. A person who owns a non-HDB flat, inherits an HDB flat, is required under the HDB’s regulations to dispose of the inherited HDB flat. This exemption applies to disposal of flats on or after 18 Dec 2015.
      11. A person who owns an HDB flat marries a person who owns another HDB flat and the couple is required under the HDB regulations to dispose of either one of the HDB flats. This exemption applies to disposal of flats on or after 18 Dec 2015.

      Remission of SSD for Residential Properties under the Remission Rules

      SSD for residential properties may be remitted for sellers / transferors under the following scenarios. Application for remission is required by sellers / transferors.

      1. Non-licensed developers may be eligible for remission of SSD when selling residential properties developed by them only if they are registered companies or businesses, and are lawfully carrying on the business of housing development.

        Administration

        1. Payment of SSD can be done via the e-Stamping Portal.
        2. For  details  on  payment  modes,  you  may  wish  to  refer to How to Pay Stamp Duty.
        3. Law firms representing the sellers are required to fill in a Seller’s Stamp Duty for Residential Properties Declaration Form. The completion of this form is mandatory.
        4. The completed form need not be submitted to IRAS. However, law firms are advised to retain the original declaration forms for at least 5 years from the date of sale/ disposal of the property as IRAS may request for it for audit purposes.
          • In a collective sale, what is the date of disposal to be considered for the purpose of determining SSD?

            For properties undergoing collective sale, the date of disposal is the date of the contract for the sale of the development between the sellers (represented by the collective sale committee) and the buyer.

          • I did not consent to the collective sale of my condominium executed on 26 February 2018. Am I liable for SSD if I had bought my condominium on 04 September 2017?

            All owners (consenting or not) whose properties were sold within the prescribed SSD holding period are liable to pay the SSD within 14 days from the date of the executed collective sale contract.

             

            In your case, you would be liable to pay 12% SSD.

          • When do I need to pay SSD and can the payment be deferred?

            SSD must be paid within 14 days from the date of the executed sale contract; penalty will be imposed for late stamping and payment. There is no deferment of stamp duty payment.

            However, for properties undergoing collective sale, we are prepared to support the request to waive penalty incurred up to the date of grant of the collective sale order (not up to the legal sale completion), provided that the collective sale contract is stamped within 14 days from the date of the executed contract. 

            To request for the waiver of penalty up to the date of grant of the collective sale order, after stamping the document, the buyer or his legal representative will have to email a copy of the executed collective sale contract to estamp@iras.gov.sg and quote the document reference number (generated upon stamping).

          • What would be the penalty for late payment?

            There would be a penalty of 5% per annum calculated on a daily basis until the stamp duty is paid.  Please refer to Late Payment of Stamp Duty for more details.

          • My then-husband and I purchased our matrimonial property on 1 Feb 2000 after we were married. We divorced on 1 Jan 2017 and my ex-husband’s half share in the matrimonial property was transferred to me on 1 Jun 2017, in accordance with the court order. I sold the property on 30 Sep 2018. Do I need to pay SSD?

            No, you are not required to pay SSD on the half share in the matrimonial property acquired from your ex-spouse on 1 Jun 2017. As the transfer of your ex-spouse’s share of the property to you was done pursuant to the divorce and in accordance with the court order, you are treated to have acquired the half share in the property on the date of marriage or date of original purchase of property, whichever is later, for SSD purpose. In your case, the date of acquisition is taken as the date of original purchase of property on 1 Feb 2000 as the property was acquired after your date of marriage.

          • I inherited a residential property on 10 Jun 2018 from my late father, who bought it in his sole name on 1 Sep 1999. I sold the property on 1 Oct 2018. Do I need to pay SSD?

            No, you are not required to pay SSD on the sale of the inherited property. As the transfer of the property to you was pursuant to inheritance, the date of your acquisition of the property is treated as the date on which your late father purchased the property (i.e. 1 Sep 1999) for SSD purpose.

          • My mother owned an HDB flat since 1 Sep 1990. I was added as a co-owner (acquired part-share from my mother) on 22 Jun 2018. We sold the flat on 31 Dec 2018. Do we need to pay SSD?

            If your acquisition of part-share of the HDB flat on 22 Jun 2018 was granted remission under the Stamp Duties (Transfer of HDB Flat within Family) (Remission) Rules 2007, the date that you acquired part-share of the flat is treated as the date on which your mother purchased the property (i.e. 1 Sep 1990) for SSD purpose. Hence, the sale of flat will not attract SSD. However, if your acquisition of the part-share of the flat on 22 Jun 2018 did not qualify for the above-mentioned remission, you are required to pay 12% SSD on your part-share as it is sold within a year from acquisition. The SSD payable is based on the higher of the selling price or market value of the part share of the property.

          • My wife and I purchased a private residential property on 1 Oct 2005. On 10 Mar 2018, my wife transferred her half share of the property to me by way of gift. As a result, I became the sole owner of the property. I sold the property on 1 Sep 2018. As I have been an owner and occupant of the property since 1 Oct 2005, do I need to pay SSD on the sale?

            Yes, as you acquired your wife’s half share of the property on 10 Mar 2018 and sold the property on 1 Sep 2018 within the SSD holding period, you are required to pay 12% SSD on the half share of the property that you had acquired from your wife. The SSD payable is based on the higher of the selling price or market value of the half share of the property.

          • I purchased (i.e. signed the Agreement for Lease) a replacement flat under the Selective En-bloc Redevelopment Scheme (SERS) on 1 Feb 2015. On 1 Sep 2018, HDB confirmed that I have fulfilled the Minimum Occupation Period (MOP) of 7 years for the replacement flat and granted approval for me to sell the replacement flat. I sold my replacement flat on 1 Oct 2018. Will the sale be subject to SSD?

            Yes. For HDB flats, the applicable MOP depends on the purchase mode, flat type, and date of flat application or key collection, while the SSD holding period commences from the date of purchase (to determine date of purchase, please click here). While you may have fulfilled the MOP for your flat, 4% SSD is still payable as the flat is sold within the SSD holding period. The SSD payable is based on the higher of the selling price or market value of the property.

             

          • I was not adjudged a bankrupt when I sold my private residential property. However, I was adjudged a bankrupt shortly after I sold my property. Can I qualify for SSD exemption and seek a refund of the SSD paid on the sale?

            No. At the time of the sale of your property, you were not a bankrupt. Hence, the sale of your property would not qualify for the SSD exemption given to an adjudged bankrupt who has to dispose of the residential property as a result of the bankruptcy.

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