To report scams or phishing attempts, chat with us or call the IRAS hotline at 1800 356 8300 from Monday to Friday, 8:00am to 5:00pm (except Public Holidays). Alternatively, you may call the police hotline at 1800 255 0000, or submit a report at www.police.gov.sg/iwitness

Oct 2022 - Scam email offering tax refunds to taxpayers 

Members of the public are advised to be on the alert for scam phishing emails impersonating IRAS. Under the pretext of offering a “tax refund”, these emails lure taxpayers to give their credit card details. 

The scam occurs in the following sequence: 

  • Members of public would receive unsolicited emails containing “Iras-gov.sg” in the scam sender name.  The scam email claims that taxpayers are eligible for a tax refund and directs them to click on an embedded link to receive the tax refund. 

Scam email - 3 Oct 2022

  • Upon clicking on the link in the email, taxpayers will be directed to a spoofed myTax Portal login page, where they would be asked to enter their telephone number and postal code.

Spoofed myTax Portal (1) - 3 Oct 2022

  • Thereafter, taxpayers would be redirected to another spoofed webpage seeking their full name and credit card details.

Spoofed myTax Portal (2) - 3 Oct 2022

  • Members of the public who have been affected by the scam are advised to lodge a police report. 

Scam phishing SMS 

Members of the public are advised to be on the alert for scam phishing SMSes impersonating IRAS. The scam SMS directs taxpayers to click on a link to provide information due to taxpayers’ “unreported income and tax evasion”.

The scam occurs in the following sequence:  

  • Members of public would receive scam phishing SMSes with the scam sender name “Mysgtax”.  The scam SMS directs them to click on an embedded link in order to provide clarifications to IRAS due to “unreported income and tax evasion”.

Scam SMS - 3 Oct 2022

  • Upon clicking on the link in the SMS, the victims would be redirected to a scam website seeking their full name and credit card details.

Scam website - 3 Oct 2022

Here are some tips to avoid getting scammed:

  • Click only on links with “iras.gov.sg” or “go.gov.sg” 
  • For tax transactions, including filing and payments, use relevant forms and digital services in myTax Portal by logging in with Singpass
  • Delete suspicious emails and SMSes asking for personal details or login credentials 
  • Do not download or open any attached files in emails and SMSes
  • Do not click on hyperlinks in suspicious emails and SMSes
  • Never disclose your passwords, SMS One-Time Passwords or One-Time OTPs to others

Sep 2022 – Phishing SMSes

We have received reports on fake SMSes purportedly from IRAS or banks using fraudulent sender IDs. The SMSes attempt to lure recipients to click on links which will lead to phishing websites.

Members of the public are advised to delete the scam SMSes and not to click on the phishing links. If you have been affected by the scam SMS, please lodge a police report.

IRAS will send SMSes on tax matters using only the sender ID “IRAS”. To prevent scammers from impersonating IRAS, we have registered with the Singapore SMS Sender ID Registry (SSIR). This allows SSIR to identify and block spoofed messages upfront. Only SMSes from IRAS will be delivered using the sender ID “IRAS”.

Screenshots of the fake SMSes are provided for reference: 

Phishing scam - 21 Sep 2022

Phishing scam - 16 Sep 2022

Phishing scam - 6 Sep 2022

SMS_6 Sep 2022

Phishing scam - 1 Sep 2022


Phishing Scams Involving IRAS and Singpass

The Police and the Inland Revenue Authority of Singapore (IRAS) have observed a sudden surge in phishing scams where scammers would impersonate as IRAS and target victims through SMSes. Since July 2022, at least 51 victims had fallen prey, with total losses amounting to at least $37,400.


The scam occurs in the following sequence:

  • Members of public would receive unsolicited SMSes containing “IRAS” in the sender name. The recipients are directed to urgently complete their tax review/inspection via an embedded link in the message. 
  • Upon clicking on the link in the SMS, the victims would be sent to a spoofed Singpass login page, where they would be asked to enter their Singpass ID and password.
  • Thereafter, the victims would be redirected to another spoofed webpage which looks like an IRAS website, and finally to a spoofed bank login page.
  • The victims would then be requested to enter their Internet banking credentials and OTPs received on their mobile phones. Victims would only discover that they had been scammed when they were notified of unauthorised transactions made from their bank accounts.

While the authorities work swiftly to take down phishing websites, user vigilance is crucial in our fight against evolving scams. The Police and IRAS advise members of the public to be on heightened alert and to follow these crime prevention measures: 

  • IRAS does not send SMSes containing links asking you to log in with your credentials (i.e. passwords and Singpass log-in details);
  • Always verify the authenticity of claims of problems with your income tax status with the official IRAS website; 
  • Ensure that the Singpass website domain you are accessing is singpass.gov.sg, with a 'lock' icon in the address bar. You may refer to the Annex for an example of the real Singpass log-in page;
  • Users should make it a point to update their contact details registered with Singpass and enable notifications via their Singpass app so that they can be promptly alerted of suspicious log-ins, e.g. when a log-in on a new device or Internet browser is detected, and contact Singpass to secure their account;
  • Log-ins to Government services should only be done at websites with domains ending with “.gov.sg”. If you received a link that does not end with “.gov.sg”, check against the list of trusted websites at www.gov.sg/trusted-sites;
  • Never disclose your personal or Internet banking details and OTPs to anyone; and 
  • Report any fraudulent transactions to your bank immediately.  

The sequence of how victims fall prey is illustrated for reference:

How Scam Victims Fall Prey


If you have any information relating to such crimes, please call the Police Hotline at 1800-255-0000, or submit it online at www.police.gov.sg/iwitness.  If you require urgent Police assistance, please dial ‘999’.  

For more information on scams, members of the public can visit www.scamalert.sg or call the Anti-Scam Hotline at 1800-722-6688.  Join the ‘Spot the Signs. Stop the Crimes’ campaign at www.scamalert.sg/fight by signing up as an advocate to receive up-to-date messages and share them with your family and friends.  Together, we can help stop scams and prevent our loved ones from becoming the next victim.   


Jul 2022 - Fake websites and SMS impersonating IRAS (Update)

[19 July 2022] We have received further reports on another fake SMS purportedly from banks. The SMS claims that IRAS has requested for the closure of account due to “a tax investigation”, luring taxpayers to click on a phishing link to do a “tax review”. Members of the public are advised to delete the SMS and not to click on the phishing link.

A screenshot of the fake SMSes provided for reference: Bank SMS impersonating IRAS

[13 July 2022] Members of the public are advised to be on the alert for fake IRAS websites and SMS impersonating IRAS. The fake websites and SMS (leading to phishing websites) attempt to solicit personal information (including Singpass login details, credit card and bank account information). 

The fake websites falsely mislead taxpayers that an audit of their tax matters is required. It claims that if taxpayers fail to comply with the audit, they will be investigated without notice.

The fake website domain URLs include the following:

hxxps://ru[.]resident-individualincometax-reporting[.]com/IRAS%20_%20e-Stamping%20Portal.php

hxxps://ru[.]resident-individualincometax-reporting[.]com/Singpass%20login.phpbit.ly/3RsygTt

https://uv[.]mediadocsdefault-sourceuploadedfilespdf.net/https-20220710

https://iras-sgj[.]mediadocsdefault-sourceuploadedfilespdf[.]cool/IRAS%20_%20e-Stamping%20Portal.php

https://bit.ly/3RsygTtirtaxeszbo.wirasgovsg-quick-linkspayments.fr/Singpass%20login.php?token=biudefo  

hxxtps://auto[.]mytax-iras[.]xyz/Singpass%20login[.]php?token=ww0712

hxxp://online[.]mytax-iras[.]top/IRAS%20_%20e-Stamping%20Portal[.]php?token=ww0712

hxxtps://wwwnm6[.]visit-haveforgottensingpassidorpassword[.]org/Singpass%20login[.]php?token=yDNSIfyouhavetheabilitydontblockm

hxxps://myinfobusiness-irascible[.]fr/Singpass%20login[.]php?token=IfyouhavetheabilitydontblockmyDNS

hxxp://202ghttpsnbk0.orgovvgovno1linkspayments[.]fr/Singpass

hxxps://revc.wwwirasgov-sgloginesvweb[.]sbs/Singpass%20login.php?token=999   

hxxps://mytax-sggovmytaxp4qqg.6555555guide-to-form-b1chinesepdf1200000[.]fr/IBWelcomeFrequentlyAsked Questions 

https://bit.ly/3ziuO5K

https://saml[.]singhome.xyz/spservice/welcome

https://saml[.]singlive[.]xyz/spservice/welcome

https://saml[.]singpei[.]xyz/spservice/welcome


Sample screenshots of the fake website (requesting Singpass login details) and SMS (leading to phishing sites requesting Singpass login details) are provided for reference:

Screenshot of the fake website

Scam SMS


A screenshot of the official Inland Revenue Authority of Singapore website (www.iras.gov.sg) is provided for reference:

Screenshot of IRAS website


For tax matters, taxpayers should transact through MyTax Portal (mytax.iras.gov.sg) by logging in with Singpass. A screenshot of the official myTax Portal is provided for reference:

Screenshot of MyTax Portal

Here are some tips to avoid getting scammed:

  • Click only on links with “iras.gov.sg” or “go.gov.sg” 
  • Check that the URL domain on the Singpass website is “singpass.gov.sg” before entering your Singpass login details
  • For tax transactions, including filing and payments, use relevant forms and digital services in myTax Portal by logging in with Singpass
  • Delete suspicious emails asking for personal details or login credentials 
  • Do not download or open any attached files in suspicious emails
  • Do not click on hyperlinks in suspicious emails
  • Never disclose your passwords or SMS One-Time Passwords to others
  • Verify officers’ identity if they claim to be from IRAS 

Members of the public who have been affected by the scam are advised to lodge a police report. 


Jun 2022 – Scam letter seeking tax payment on investment profit

We have been alerted of a scam letter, purportedly from IRAS, instructing the recipient to pay income tax on their investment profit to ensure “the safety of their funds”.

The scam letter claimed that IRAS received a report on the recipient’s investment profit which is subject to 17% income tax. The letter also quoted IRAS’ e-Tax Guide on Income Tax Treatment of Digital Tokens to mislead the recipient that income tax is payable on the profit before a refund will be issued. The recipient is then instructed to make payment within 4 days or face enforcement/legal action by IRAS if payment is not made.

A screenshot of the scam latter is provided below for reference: 

Scam letter seeking tax payment on investment profit

IRAS would like to advise that the authority does not receive reports of private investments made by taxpayers. Taxpayers are required to file their tax returns at mytax.iras.gov.sg using SingPass login. IRAS’ letters and notices are deposited in the secured tax portal at mytax.iras.gov.sg and taxpayers may log in to the portal to retrieve them.

Members of the public are advised to ignore such emails and not to provide any personal, credit card or bank account details, make any payments to a third party’s bank account or follow any instructions by the sender. Those who have been affected by the scam are advised to lodge police reports.  

 


 

Jun 2022 – Scam calls via Whatsapp

Members of the public have reported that they have received suspicious calls purportedly from IRAS via WhatsApp.

IRAS would like to advise that it does not make calls through messaging applications such as WhatsApp, Telegram or Viber. Members of the public are advised to ignore such calls and not to provide any personal or bank account details, make any payments to a third party’s bank account or follow any instructions by the caller.

If you receive a scam call on a messaging app, do a “Report and Block”. This will ensure the app will take down the account and help to stall the scammers from using that number to make more calls to potential victims. For scam calls via phones, block the number immediately.

A screenshot of the scam WhatsApp call is provided: 

Scam Whatsapp Calls Images_13Jun2022

 

When in doubt, contact IRAS at 1800 356 8300 or chat with us for verification. 

If you suspect that you have responded to a phishing scam with personal or financial information, you are advised to:

  • lodge a police report;
  • change the passwords or PINs on all your online accounts; and
  • contact your banks to stop any transactions   

Jun 2022 – Scam call and email impersonating IRAS to steal users’ data

We have been informed of scam cases involving scammers impersonating as IRAS officers by calling on taxpayers or sending fraudulent emails to solicit their personal information.

There are taxpayers who have received calls from scammers impersonating as IRAS officers claiming that they were eligible for tax refunds. The scammers then solicited for taxpayers' bank account details and OTPs to facilitate the supposed “refunds”. Unauthorised transactions were then made by the scammers.

Members of the public are also advised to be on the alert if they receive a scam email informing them that they have overpaid for taxes and will get a refund if they provide their personal details using an attached form.

The scam email, spoofing the @iras.gov.sg domain and signed off using IRAS’ email signature, lures users to provide their bank account details and other personal information (work permit number, address, email contact) through a fraudulent “Tax Act requirement form” attached in the email.

A screenshot of the scam email is provided for reference:  

IRAS will never disclose taxpayers’ tax amount in unauthenticated emails. We will also not solicit any confidential information or your credit card/bank account details by email or over the phone. Taxpayers are advised to transact with IRAS for their tax matters through mytax.iras.gov.sg using Singpass login.

Here are some tips to avoid getting scammed:  

  • Delete suspicious emails asking for personal details or login credentials, especially those involving the use of Singpass  
  • Do not download any attached files in suspicious emails
  • Do not click on hyperlinks in suspicious emails
  • Never disclose your bank account detail, password or OTP to others.

Members of the public who have been affected by the scam email are advised to lodge a police report.


 

Jun 2022 – Do not click on scam attachment seeking company income tax information  

Members of the public are advised to be on the alert if they receive a scam email (with an attached file) sent using spoofed IRAS email. The phishing email instructs taxpayers to check on the status of their corporate income tax returns or to file their tax returns by clicking on the attached file.

As the Corporate Tax Filing Season 2022 has started and will end on 30 Nov 2022, taxpayers should be alert to phishing scams attempting to steal data or money. Taxpayers should take note that IRAS does not send emails to taxpayers requesting them to check on the status of their corporate income tax returns or file their tax returns via an attached file. All corporate income tax transactions are done through mytax.iras.gov.sg using Singpass login.

Screenshots of the phishing emails are provided for reference: 

Variation 1 instructing taxpayer to check on status of corporate income tax return via attached file:


Variation 2: instructing taxpayer to file corporate income tax return via attached file

Stay Vigilant Against Phishing Scams

In view of the rise in phishing scams, IRAS would like to advise taxpayers to be vigilant and not to be deceived by fake emails, SMSs and WhatsApp messages with the spoofed IRAS name. For tax transactions including filing and payments, taxpayers should use relevant forms and digital services in mytax.iras.gov.sg secured by Singpass login. IRAS will also not solicit taxpayers’ personal details or any confidential information via email or loose web links.  

Do not provide any personal, credit card or bank account details to suspicious contacts over a phone call, SMS or WhatsApp, or make any payments to a third party’s bank account.

Those who have been affected by the scam are advised to lodge police reports. 


May 2022 – Scam email on income tax return

We have been alerted of a scam email requesting recipients to click on a fraudulent link to make payment due to discrepancies in their tax returns.

The scam email, sent from <[email protected]>, informs the recipients that they have received information from third parties (employers, financial institutions) which do not match the submitted tax returns. Recipients are instructed to click on a fraudulent link to make payment for the amount owed due to the discrepancy.

Members of the public are advised to ignore such emails and not to click on the fraudulent links. Do not provide any personal, credit card or bank account details, make payments to a third party’s bank account or follow any instructions by the sender. Those who have been affected by the scam are advised to lodge police reports. 

A screenshot of the scam email is provided for reference: 

Scam advisory 12 May 2022

Stay Vigilant Against Phishing Scams

In view of the rise in phishing scams, IRAS would like to advise taxpayers to be vigilant and not be deceived by fake SMSes, emails and WhatsApp messages with spoofed IRAS’ name. For tax transactions including filing and payments, taxpayers should use relevant forms and digital services in myTax Portal secured by Singpass login. IRAS will also not solicit taxpayers’ personal details or any confidential information via email or loose web links.  



March 2022 – Scam letter on bank account freeze

We have been alerted of a scam letter, purportedly from IRAS, signed off in the name of Ng Wai Choong (wrongly designated as Chairman of the Inland Revenue), informing recipients that their bank accounts have been placed on hold by IRAS due to outstanding tax defaults. The scam letter instructs the recipients to pay off their outstanding tax defaults with a cash deposit in order for their bank accounts to be reactivated. A transaction receipt is sent together with the scam letter.  

A screenshot of the scam letter and transaction receipt is provided below for reference: 

Scam letter image Mar 2022

Scam receipt image Mar 2022

Members of the public are advised to ignore such letters and not to provide any personal, credit card or bank account details, make payments to a third party’s bank account or follow any instructions by the sender. Those who have been affected by the scam are advised to lodge police reports. 


Beware of Fraudulent PayNow QR Codes: Check Before Scanning

With the increased usage of PayNow QR codes, scammers may be using such codes as a means to perpetuate new scams. Fraudulent QR codes may contain phishing links or malware that allows scammers to access applications on your smartphone.

IRAS does not send PayNow QR codes to members of the public via physical and digital notices and letters, emails, SMSes and WhatsApp messages. Taxpayers can only generate PayNow QR codes for payment after logging into myTax Portal or upon selecting the “Make Tax Payment” option in the chatbot located on IRAS’ website at www.iras.gov.sg. If you would like to make payments to IRAS via PayNow QR codes, please use only these two platforms. From these platforms, you will need to log in to your mobile banking app and scan the PayNow QR code to make payment. When making payment, please verify that the payee’s name is “Inland Revenue Authority of Singapore/AG” before authorising the e-payment.

Tips for Avoiding QR Code Scams

To avoid being scammed, here are some tips:

  • Scan a QR code only if it is from a trusted source;
  • Verify that the QR code redirects you to official websites with domain names ending with “.gov.sg”;
  • Verify the payee’s name before authorising the e-payment;
  • Install a mobile security application on your smartphone to protect against malware.

 Members of the public are advised to exercise caution when scanning QR codes and not to provide any personal details such as bank account numbers or credit card details.


Feb 2022 – Scam SMS with phishing link (Update)

We have been alerted of a scam SMS purportedly from IRAS informing recipients to click on a link "https://singaporeposte.com" to obtain important information. Scammers have spoofed IRAS’ Sender ID and the fake SMS is grouped together with past legitimate SMSes sent by IRAS. Members of the public are advised to ignore the message and not to click on the link. Those who have been affected by the scam are advised to lodge police reports.

[9 Feb 2022] Scammers have been using varying formats to send scam SMSes. The latest is using the Sender ID ‘IRASinfo’ with phishing links. Members of the public are advised not to click on links that do not end with “.iras.gov.sg” or “go.gov.sg”.

[4 Feb 2022] We have received further reports that the scam SMS is circulating with phishing links that direct recipients to a fake SingPost website. Members of the public should continue to exercise caution and not click on suspicious links.

There may be different variations of scam SMSes circulating in the community. Please refer to screenshots of the scam SMSes that were reported:


Taxpayers should remain vigilant against phishing scams, particularly during peak tax filing seasons as more of such scam attempts may occur. Scammers would trick taxpayers into giving out their personal information, credit card or bank account details, making any payments to a third party’s bank account or following any instructions by the sender.

Here are some useful tips to avoid getting scammed:

  • Verify the authenticity of the message with IRAS if you find the message suspicious;
  • Pay attention to dubious SMS messages with grammatical errors and clickable links directing to websites without “.iras.gov.sg” or “go.gov.sg” domains;
  • Do not disclose your personal information such as bank account details and passwords.


Beware of Fake SMSes, Emails and WhatsApp Messages: Check Before Clicking

With the recent rise in phishing scams that involve digital communications with fake SMSes, emails and WhatsApp messages with spoof headers, it is important to verify any links before clicking them. Especially for SMSes, fake ones might be grouped with past legitimate SMSes under the same SMS Sender ID, with direct clickable links to websites that closely resemble that of authorities.

Protect yourself from phishing links

 Suspicious SMSes/ emails/ WhatsApp messages may contain the following:

  • Instructions to click on unsecured links or download attachments for more information
  • Clickable links directing to websites without “.iras.gov.sg” or ”go.gov.sg” domains
  • Requests for personal information such as bank account details and passwords

Do not provide any personal, credit card or bank account details over an SMS, email or WhatsApp, or make any payments to a third party’s bank account. When in doubt, contact IRAS at 1800 356 8300 for verification.

Members of the public who have been affected by phishing scams are advised to lodge a police report.

Is this SMS legitimate?

Some taxpayers may have received an SMS from IRAS regarding their property tax bill, with clickable links directing taxpayers to myTax Portal and instant payment via PayNow QR/AXS through a Chatbot. This is a genuine SMS sent by IRAS. 

 

If you have made payment for your property tax via the link in the SMS, you can log in to myTax Portal under “Account > View Account Summary” to confirm that the payment has been received by IRAS.  

 


Jan 2022 – Scam Website – ‘iras.gov-sg.web.do’

We have been alerted of a scam website “iras.gov-sg.web.do” that requests taxpayers to key in their details using ‘Reimbursement Request Form’ to obtain a tax refund from IRAS.

Members of the public are advised to ignore this website and not to provide any personal, credit card or bank account details, make any payments to a third party’s bank account or follow any instructions provided. Those who have been affected by the scam are advised to lodge police reports.

Below is a screenshot of the scam website.

 

What you can expect for tax refunds

Corporate Income Tax and GST refunds due to you will be credited directly to your bank account. For Property Tax and Personal Income Tax refunds, IRAS will also credit the refund directly to your bank account or via Telegraphic Transfer (TT) or cheques if you do not pay taxes via GIRO.

 If IRAS requires information from you, IRAS will not disclose nor solicit your personal details or any confidential information via email or unsecured web links. IRAS officers will direct you to use the relevant forms secured by Singpass login or sign-up links located on the IRAS website to furnish your personal details and bank account information, if required.

To avoid getting scammed, here are some tips on identifying suspicious websites:

  • URLs not ending with “.iras.gov.sg” or ”go.gov.sg” domains
  • Misspelt words or typos in the URL
  • Web addresses that are flagged as ‘Not Secure’
Update: The scam website has been blocked for access  in Singapore . While access to the site from Singapore has been blocked, there may be attempts by scammers to use other variations of the website name to continue to deceive users. 
Members of the public should continue to exercise caution and verify the authenticity of websites before clicking on them. 

 


Jan 2022 – Scam Email on approval pass for international funds transfer

We have been alerted of a scam email purportedly from IRAS, signed off in the name of Commissioner of Inland Revenue, informing the recipients that their bank accounts had been blocked from receiving an unverified international funds transfer. The scammers further instructed the recipients to obtain a letter of confirmation or to buy an approval pass to facilitate the transfer.

A screenshot of the scam email is provided below for reference.

 

IRAS would like to advise that the authority will not ask you to obtain any kind of approval pass to facilitate a funds transfer. 

Members of the public are advised to ignore such emails and not to provide any personal, credit card or bank account details, make any payments to a third party’s bank account or follow any instructions by the sender. Those who have been affected by the scam are advised to lodge police reports.

2020 to 2021

 

Nov 2021 – Scam Email – ‘Outstanding tax payments’

Members of the public who received an email from ‘Singapore Government Tax Authority’ with the subject heading ‘Outstanding tax payments’ are advised to ignore it and not to open or download the documents attached in the email. The documents may contain malicious computer virus.

A screenshot of the scam email is provided below for reference.

IRAS’ official emails are sent from addresses ending with ‘@iras.gov.sg’. We will not send taxpayers’ payment statements and tax notices over emails. They are deposited in myTax portal which taxpayers have to log in with their Singpass for added security.

 

Members of the public who have been affected by the scam are advised to lodge police reports.

Aug 2021 – WhatsApp scam calls on penalty for unpaid taxes

Members of the public have reported that they have received suspicious calls purportedly from IRAS via WhatsApp. The scammers would claim to be from IRAS and inform taxpayers that they faced a penalty for unpaid taxes. They would further request to verify credit card details for payment of the penalty.

Below is a screenshot of the scam call for reference:

 

IRAS would like to advise that it does not make calls to taxpayers through messaging applications such as WhatsApp. IRAS will also not ask you to verify credit card or bank account details over the phone.

Members of the public are advised to ignore such calls and not to provide any personal, credit card or bank account details, make any payments to a third party’s bank account or follow any instructions by the caller. Those who have been affected by the scam are advised to lodge police reports.

May 2021 – Scam Email ‘ACCOUNT REACTIVATION’  

We have been alerted by members of the public of a scam email titled ‘ACCOUNT REACTIVATION’, purportedly from IRAS. The email sender claimed to have received full payment of the tax evasion penalty from the recipient and advised the recipient to open a new bank account or provide IRAS with bank account details to perform a fund transfer. 

 

A screenshot of the scam email is provided below for reference: 

 

IRAS would like to advise members of the public to ignore the email and not to respond with any personal details. IRAS will not request taxpayers to open a new bank account. Taxpayers’ payment statements and tax notices are deposited in myTax portal, which taxpayers have to log in with their Singpass for added security.

To avoid getting scammed, here are some tips on identifying suspicious emails:

  • Email addresses not ending with ‘@iras.gov.sg’
  • Requests for personal information such as bank account details and passwords
  • Instructions to set up new bank accounts or transfer tax payments through unfamiliar payment channels such as cryptocurrency e-wallets

Members of the public who have been affected by the scam are advised to lodge police reports.

 

 

Feb 2021 – Scam letter issued by cryptocurrency investment platform

There have been reports of a suspicious letter purportedly from IRAS circulating amongst individuals who have invested in a cryptocurrency platform. The letter requested for the account holder to make tax payment to a digital payment address before the account could be unlocked.    

A screenshot of the scam letter is provided below for reference.

 

 

IRAS would like to advise members of the public to ignore such letters as it is a scam. IRAS will not send tax bills to taxpayers by email nor request for any tax payments to unlock any investment account. IRAS’ letters and notices are deposited in the secured tax portal at mytax.iras.gov.sg and taxpayers may log in to the portal to retrieve them.

To avoid getting scammed, here are some tips on identifying suspicious documents:

  • The document is sent through an unsecured email account such as Hotmail, Gmail or other unfamiliar email domains instead of an email address ending with ‘@iras.gov.sg’.
  • The document does not include an official sign off with the IRAS officer’s name and designation.
  • The message employs scare tactics such as issuing ultimatums in hopes of pressuring you to respond quickly out of fear.
  • Instructions to transfer tax payments through unfamiliar payment channels such as cryptocurrency e-wallets.

Those who have been affected by the scam are advised to lodge police reports.

 

Nov 2020 – Scam Email – ‘Coronavirus Tax Relief and Economic Impact Payments’

We have been alerted by members of the public of a fake email titled ‘Coronavirus Tax Relief and Economic Impact Payments’. The email purportedly from IRAS, claimed to be offering a new COVID-19 tax relief, including health plans, for businesses and individuals affected by the pandemic. The email also stated that the payments were in progress but met with some delays. The recipients were requested to check their payment status and download a document on tax relief for more information. 

We have been alerted by members of the public of a fake email titled ‘Coronavirus Tax Relief and Economic Impact Payments’. The email purportedly from IRAS, claimed to be offering a new COVID-19 tax relief, including health plans, for businesses and individuals affected by the pandemic. The email also stated that the payments were in progress but met with some delays. The recipients were requested to check their payment status and download a document on tax relief for more information.

 

IRAS would like to advise members of the public to ignore the email and not to respond, download attachments or click on any links.

To avoid getting scammed, here are some tips on identifying suspicious calls and emails: 

  • Email addresses not ending with ‘@iras.gov.sg’

  • Requests for personal information such as bank account details and passwords

  • Requests for immediate payment transfer accompanied by threats of enforcement action or legal penalties

  • Mentions of confidential information such as the amount of taxes owed

  • Instructions to click on unsecured links or download attachments for more information

Members of the public who have been affected by the scam are advised to lodge police reports.

 

Oct 2020 – Phone and Email Scam – ‘Iras Refund letter…2015-2018’

A similar email with the subject titled ‘Iras Refund letter…2015-2018’ has been resurfaced to scam members of the public, informing them of their tax refund due to overpaid taxes. The scammers would follow up with a phone call in an attempt to obtain personal details.

IRAS would like to advise members of the public to ignore any calls and emails received pertaining to such matters. Do not provide any personal details as requested by the caller nor download any attachments or click on any links in the scam email.

To avoid getting scammed, here are some tips on how to identify suspicious emails:

  • email addresses not ending with ‘@iras.gov.sg’

  • email asking for your personal details such as bank account information and password

  • email mentioning confidential information such as the amount of taxes owed

 

Sep 2020 – Viber scam calls on immediate payment of outstanding taxes

Members of the public have reported that they have received suspicious calls purportedly from IRAS via messaging applications such as Viber. The scammers would claim to be from IRAS and request for immediate payment on outstanding taxes. They would further request for confidential details such as Internet Banking login credentials and One-Time Passwords (OTPs) to verify the payment. Unauthorised transactions would then be made from the bank accounts of victims who provided the details.

Below is a screenshot of the scam call for reference: 

IRAS would like to advise that it does not make calls through messaging applications such as Viber or WhatsApp. IRAS will also not ask you to provide confidential details such as bank account login details over the phone.

Members of the public are advised to ignore such calls and not to provide any personal or bank account details, make any payments to a third party’s bank account or follow any instructions by the caller. Those who have been affected by these scams are advised to lodge police reports. 

 

 

July 2020 – Phone and Email Scam - ‘Iras Refund letter… 2017 – 2019’ 

 

Members of the public have reported to us that they have received suspicious calls from scammers impersonating IRAS officers, informing them of their tax refund due to overpaid taxes and requesting for their bank account details. The scammers would follow up with an email with subject title ‘Iras Refund letter…2017-2019’.

 

IRAS would like to advise members of the public to ignore any calls and emails received pertaining to such matters. Do not provide your personal details as requested by the caller nor download any attachments or click on any links in the scam email.

 

IRAS would like to advise members of the public to ignore any calls and emails received pertaining to such matters. Do not provide your personal details as requested by the caller nor download any attachments or click on any links in the scam email.

What you can expect for tax refunds

Tax refunds due to you are sent by cheque to your registered address or credited directly to your bank account if you have been paying your taxes by GIRO.

If IRAS requires information from you, it would be useful to know that IRAS will not disclose nor solicit your personal details or any confidential information by email. The name of the officer sending the email will be shown clearly. IRAS officers will direct you to use the FormSG on the IRAS website (‘Direct Credit Authorisation to Bank account in Singapore’ or ‘Telegraphic Transfer/Bank Draft to Foreign Bank Account’) to furnish your personal details and bank account information, if required.

If you are writing to IRAS on confidential matters, you are encouraged to use myTax Mail which requires the use of Singpass to log in via myTax Portal, for added security.

To avoid getting scammed, here are some tips on how to identify suspicious emails:

  • email addresses not ending with ‘@iras.gov.sg’

  • email asking for your personal details such as bank account information and password

  • email mentioning confidential information such as the amount of taxes owed

Members of the public who have been affected by the scam are advised to lodge police reports.

June 2020 – Scam call on government payouts

Scammers pretending to be from IRAS have been calling on unsuspecting members of the public and threatening to withhold their government payouts, such as the Self-Employed Person Relief Scheme (SIRS) payout, if they do not pay up on their taxes.

IRAS would like to advise members of the public to ignore such calls and not to follow any instructions by the caller.

Those who are eligible for SIRS payouts will be notified by NTUC via letter or SMS. The payouts will be credited directly to the recipient’s bank account or mailed out via cheque to the recipient’s address.

Those who have been affected by the scam are advised to lodge police reports.

 

 

June 2020 – Scam Email – ‘Tax payment’

Members of the public are advised to ignore a scam email titled ‘Tax payment’. Please do not respond to the email, further circulate the email, click on any links or download attachments if any.

A screenshot of the scam email is provided below for reference.

 

Apr 2020 – Scam Calls Requesting for Personal and Bank Account Details in the Pretext of Making Tax Refunds or Imposing Fines

There have been reports by members of the public that they have received suspicious calls from scammers who claimed to be from IRAS, asking them to provide their personal and bank account details due to failed transfer of tax refunds or payment of fines for their tax crimes. The phone number displayed on the phone screen included '65659913', ‘62691422’,'+65-62691422', '+65-65659913', '+65-62607797', '+65-63661302', '+65-67819652', ‘+65-65659913’,'+65-68932159' and '+65-91322819'.

To detect spoof calls, members of the public are advised to exercise care when answering local calls showing a ‘+’ sign prefix, as these are likely to be overseas calls masking their country code or impersonating local numbers to mislead potential victims.

IRAS will not call taxpayers to ask for bank account details to make tax refunds or request for payment of fines. For tax refund matters, we will correspond with taxpayers via email or SMS to call our office’s telephone number.

Members of the public who receive such calls are advised to ignore the call and any instructions provided by the caller. Those who have been affected by the scam are advised to lodge police reports.

Mar 2020 - Scam calls with Automated Voice Messages

Members of the public have alerted us that they have received calls with automated voice messages informing them to file their taxes and make payment. The voice message further instructs them to press ‘1’ to verify their details and upon doing so, it will be routed to a person who claims to be an IRAS officer requesting for personal information. The caller ID displayed different mobile phone numbers that included ‘+65 97779491’, ‘97775096’ and ‘97778762’. 

IRAS would like to advise that it does not use mobile phones with automated messaging systems to contact taxpayers. For verification purposes, our officers will send a One-Time-PIN (OTP) via SMS to taxpayer’s registered mobile number or ask for your previous tax transactions with IRAS. 

Please ignore such calls and the instructions given by the caller. Those who have been affected by the scam are advised to lodge police reports.

Mar 2020 – Scam calls

There have been several reports from members of the public that they have received calls from scammers who claimed that they have court orders and lawsuits with IRAS and they have to transfer their unpaid taxes immediately. The phone numbers displayed on the caller ID are IRAS’ helpline numbers that included “63568300” and “63568233”. Scammers may have used the spoofing technique to mask their real numbers and instead manipulate IRAS’ caller IDs displayed on the phone. 

IRAS will not ask you to make a payment to a third party’s bank account through a telephone call. Members of the public who receive such calls are advised to ignore the call and any instructions provided by the caller. Those who have been affected by the scam are advised to lodge police reports. 

 

 

Feb 2020 - Scam Email - 'Important notice regarding your tax information' 

 

Members of the public are advised to ignore a scam email titled 'Important notice regarding your tax information’. Please do not respond to the email, further circulate the email nor click on the link provided. 

 

A screenshot of the scam email is provided below for reference. 

 

2018 to 2019

Dec 2019 - Scam Email - 'Inland Revenue Authority of Singapore-Refund-Online-Confirmation'

Members of the public are advised to ignore an image of a scam email titled 'Inland Revenue Authority of Singapore-Refund-Online-Confirmation' that has been re-circulating on WhatsApp. Please do not respond to the email nor further circulate the image. 

A screenshot of the scam email is provided below for reference.

 

Nov 2019 - Scam Email on '30 Nov 2019 Corporate Tax Filing'

The Corporate Tax filing due date is near and scammers are taking this opportunity to trick taxpayers into giving out their personal information which may be used for fraudulent purposes. Please do not respond to this scam email with subject heading '30 Nov 2019 Corporate Tax Filing' nor download the file attached in the email. Members of the public are advised to lodge a police report if they received such emails.

A screenshot of the scam email is provided below for reference:

 

Nov 2019 - Scam Email

Members of the public who received email with subject heading 'Tax Invoice from Inland Revenue Authority of Singapore (IRAS)' are advised to ignore it and not to download the document attached in the email.

A screenshot of the scam email is provided below for reference.

 

Oct 2019 - Scam Email 'Corporate Income Return for YA 2019'

Companies are advised to be vigilant and not fall into the trap of scam emails during this Corporate Tax Filing season. Similar scam email with subject heading 'Corporate Income Return for YA 2019' has been surfacing again. Please do not download the file attached in the email as it may contain computer virus. Any person who has received the scam email may wish to consider lodging a police report.


 

Sep 2019 - Scam Email

Members of the public are advised not to respond to the scam email as shown in the screenshot below. If you have responded and shared your personal or financial information, you are advised to lodge a police report, change your passwords on your online accounts and contact your banks to stop any transactions.

 

Aug 2019

  • Scam Email - 'Inland Revenue Authority of Singapore-Refund-Online-Confirmation'

Members of the public are advised to ignore an image of a scam email titled 'Inland Revenue Authority of Singapore-Refund-Online-Confirmation' that has been circulating on WhatsApp. Please do not respond to the email nor further circulate the image. 

A screenshot of the scam email is provided below for reference.

 

  • Scam Calls

There have been reports from several members of the public that they received calls from scammers impersonating IRAS officers. The phone number displayed on the caller ID included 1800 3568300, and the scammer requested for outstanding tax amount to be paid. Members of the public who receive such calls are advised to ignore the instructions given by the caller.

  • Scam Email - 'Tax Invoice from Inland Revenue Authority of Singapore (IRAS)'

An email scam is doing the rounds using IRAS' name, with attachments of 'invoices', to trick people to make payments.

The email address does not end with 'iras.gov.sg' which is a tell-tale sign that it is not an authentic email.

Members of the public are advised to ignore the email and not to click or download the attachments.

A screenshot of the scam email is provided below for reference.

Jun 2019 - Scam Email

Members of the public are advised to ignore emails that are sent from [email protected] with attachment on Corporate Income Tax Return status. The attachment may contain computer virus and you are advised not to click or download it.

Companies can view their Corporate Tax filing status by logging in to myTax Portal or using the Corporate Tax Integrated Phone Service.
A screenshot of the scam email is provided below for reference.

 

May 2019 - Scam Email

Members of the public who receive emails from [email protected] with the subject heading "Update Your Tax Information." are advised not to download the document attached in the email.

A screenshot of the scam email is provided below for reference.

 

Apr 2019 - Scam Calls

There have been reports from several members of the public that they received calls from scammers impersonating IRAS officers. The phone numbers displayed on the caller ID included 97812000 and 63568387, and several of the calls involved requesting of credit card information and tax refunds. IRAS does not request credit card details by phone. Members of the public who receive such calls are advised to ignore the instructions given by the caller. Those who have been affected by the scam are advised to lodge police reports.


Feb 2019 - Scam Email - "Your IRAS 2018 Tax Report!!!"

A scam email that mimics IRAS email address ending with "@iras.gov.sg" with the subject heading "Your IRAS 2018 Tax Report!!!" has been circulating to members of the public. Please ignore and do not download the attachment in the email.

A screenshot of the scam email is provided below for reference.

 

 

 

Dec 2018 – Scam Email – “Your tax records and open statements December 2018: The money for the state budget is also your money!”

Members of the public who receive emails with the subject heading “Your tax records and open statements December 2018: The money for the state budget is also your money!” are advised not to click on any link or download the attachment in the email.

A screenshot of the scam email is provided below for reference.

 

Nov 2018 - Scam Calls with Automated Voice Messages

There have been reports from members of the public that they have received scam calls with automated voice messages, claiming to be calling on behalf of IRAS regarding investigations on a fraudulent case. The caller would also request for a return call. The phone number displayed on the caller ID include '3108 0946'.

IRAS would like to advise that it does not use automated messaging systems to contact members of the public for such purposes. Please ignore such calls and the caller's instructions. Members of the public who have received such calls are advised to lodge a police report.


Aug 2018 - Scam Email - "Update Your Tax Information."

Members of the public who receive emails with the subject heading "Update Your Tax Information." are advised not to download the document attached in the email.

A screenshot of the scam email is provided below for reference.

 

 

Jun 2018 - Scam Email - "VALIDATE YOUR TAX INFORMATION"

Members of the public who receive emails with the subject heading "VALIDATE YOUR TAX INFORMATION" are advised not to click on any link or download the PDF attachment in the email.

A screenshot of the scam email is provided below for reference

 

Jun 2018 - Scam Calls

There have been reports from members of the public that they have received calls from scammers impersonating as IRAS officers, requesting them to provide their credit card numbers to get a tax refund. The phone numbers displayed on the caller ID included '91835521' and '63562144'. 

IRAS does not request credit card details by phone. Members of the public who receive such calls are advised to ignore the instructions given by the caller. Those who have been affected by the scam are advised to lodge police reports.

 

Apr 2018 - Scam Email - "TAX INFORMATION UPDATE"

Members of the public who receive emails with the subject heading "TAX INFORMATION UPDATE" are advised not to download the PDF attachment and provide your personal information.  
A screenshot of the scam email is provided below for reference.

 

Feb 2018 - Scam Calls

There have been reports from members of the public that they have received suspicious calls from persons claiming to be IRAS officers, asking them to pay their outstanding taxes immediately via an ATM bank transfer to an unknown account. The phone number displayed on the caller IDs included IRAS' Individual Income Tax helpline “63568300”.

IRAS does not make telephone calls asking taxpayers to transfer money to third party's bank account. Members of the public who receive such calls are advised to ignore the instructions given by the caller and are encouraged to lodge police reports if they have fallen victim to such frauds. 

If you receive any other suspicious phone calls, we advise that you request the caller’s full name, telephone number and department, and contact IRAS at 1800 356 8300 or chat with us for verification.

How to recognise scams

There have been reported cases of individuals receiving emails, letters, Short Message Services (SMS), or phone calls purportedly from IRAS, requesting you to do one or more of the following:

  • Open an email link or file attachment to review your income or tax statement;
  • Transfer a sum of money, supposedly for tax purposes, to accounts belonging to named individuals (usually an overseas account); and/or
  • Pay sums of money to named individuals (usually a party not residing in Singapore) before an inheritance/estate of a deceased party is released.
  • Provide your bank account numbers to claim tax refunds, enjoy cash rewards, or pay outstanding tax bills; and/or
  • Provide confidential personal information such as personal particulars, personal identification numbers, passwords and bank account numbers, either by completing a form on a website or to someone who impersonates as IRAS staff.

For your own interest, please be extra careful when you receive unsolicited emails, letters, SMSes, phone calls, online chats or all other forms of communication asking you to provide confidential or personal information. Under no circumstances should you give personal information including credit card or banking details to third parties via email, letter, SMS or phone.

Important Note: 

  1. Lately, scam emails that mimic IRAS’ email address ending with “ @iras.gov.sg” have been sent to some members of the public. Certain parts of the email details have been changed by the scammers to make them appear as if the email was sent by IRAS. Such scam emails usually carry a file attachment requesting the recipients to open it.  You are advised not to click on any link or open any attachment in the email as it may contain computer virus.
  2. IRAS does not send out official emails from personal email accounts such as Hotmail, Gmail, or other unfamiliar email domains. IRAS’ email replies are usually signed off with an officer's name, designation and contact information. IRAS also does not send out confidential documents such as tax return forms, notices of assessment, refund letters or other tax statements through unsecured emails. Confidential documents are deposited in the secured tax portal at mytax.iras.gov.sg. Taxpayers may log in to the portal using their Singpass to retrieve their tax statements or e-File their tax returns via mytax.iras.gov.sg.
  3. IRAS will not ask you to provide your confidential personal details through emails. We encourage you to use  myTax Mail to correspond with IRAS. If your enquiry contains confidential information, we will respond to you via myTax Mail.
  4. IRAS officers will not call you outside of our helpline operating hours (Mondays to Fridays: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.). If you receive any suspicious phone calls, we advise that you request the caller’s full name, telephone number and department, and contact IRAS at 1800 356 8300 or chat with us for verification.
  1. For payments to IRAS made via Internet Banking, DBS Paylah!, ATM Bill Payment and AXS Mobile and Internet, you have to select ‘IRAS’ from the list of payees.
  2. When you make a cheque payment for tax, it must only be made payable to one of the relevant payees, as given below :
  • Comptroller of Income Tax
  • Comptroller of Goods & Services Tax
  • Comptroller of Property Tax
  • Commissioner of Stamp Duties 
  • Inland Revenue Authority of Singapore

 

Here are some tips to recognise a scam:   

  • Promises of money for little or no effort
  • Deals that sound too good to be true
  • Peculiar email addresses and website URLs    

How to verify if the officer is indeed from IRAS 

For face-to-face engagements, the officer will present an IRAS identification card.

You can also verify the officer’s identity by calling IRAS at the dedicated hotline stated in the email or letter.

 

How to report a scam  

Anyone who has received a suspicious email, letter, SMS or phone call purportedly from the Inland Revenue Authority of Singapore (IRAS) should immediately contact IRAS to verify the authenticity of such request.

Do not respond to them or click on any hyperlink in the email. In the case of suspicious phone calls, you should request for the caller’s full name, telephone number and department, and contact IRAS at 1800 356 8300 or chat with us for verification.

If you suspect that you have responded to a phishing scam with personal or financial information, you are advised to:

  • lodge a police report;
  • change the passwords or PINs on all your online accounts; and
  • contact your banks to stop any transactions